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Jan 012016
 

It’s such a cliché to start a blog on January 1st with resolutions. Yeah, should probably resolve to use fewer clichés in my writing. I’ll get to that later. For now, I’m just happy to be back, after more than a year of no blogging. I could give you all manner of excuses about why I let the blog go, but the truth is a few bumps in my life and the habit died. I kept meaning to get back to it (insert cliché about good intentions and Hell). Ultimately it came down to “It was too much like work and I didn’t have the time.”

Jul 032013
 

There is a lot of advice out there for writers. Almost everyone who is a writer has advice for other writers. Me included. One thing that isn’t said often enough is that you have to be careful about what advice you follow. I don’t mean that some advice is bad in general, rather that not all of it will apply to you.

 

Dean Wesley Smith, a very prolific and varied writer, talks about Heinlein’s rules. The rules are simple enough:

1. You must write.

2. You must finish what you write.

Jun 302013
 

I am not a parent. I don’t want to be a parent. My body has made it perfectly clear it doesn’t want to be a parent either. Yet I love kids. I like having them around. They are so full of interesting inspiration and full on creativity that it’s like magic. For me, that makes being an Aunt almost perfect.

 

Recently, I found myself with three nieces and a nephew in my house for the afternoon. I’d borrowed them to help with a yard work project that took all of half an hour, but my brother couldn’t pick them up until after dinner. So, for half a day, I became a parent. I know, it’s not much, but it gave me the flavor of all the parent/writers out there.

Apr 032013
 

I recently attended Minicon 48 in Bloomington Minnesota. It was a wonderful weekend full of interesting discussions and reconnecting with old friends. I could go for the standard “Con Report” style blog post where I give you tidbits about my weekend, or I could go in depth over the course of several posts about the conversations that intrigued me the most. I’m going with the latter option.

 

Community in the Information Age (7:00pm Saturday)

 

Mar 132013
 

There are two schools of thought about writing (in the most general terms). The school that says that you must wait for the muse to come by and give you inspiration. And the school that says you should sit your butt in the chair and write even when the muse is vacationing in Florida. As with anything of this sort, I think the truth is somewhere in the middle.

Getting writing done is a lot about getting in the groove. That sounds a lot like waiting for the muse, except that getting in the groove is something that you can control. You just have to figure out how to find your groove reliably. Because unlike your muse, your groove doesn’t go on vacation.

Jan 092013
 

I have to start by telling you that so far this year is – for the most part – going very well on the writing front. I’ve already sent out my first submission for the year and have a full line up for editing and writing new stories and novels. So keep that in mind as I tell you some of the not so good things that are happening and their effects on my ability to produce.

Dec 282012
 

It’s time for another blog exchange. I’ve traded topics with Winona Hulsey: Surviving the Holidays as a Writer. You’ll find links to my thoughts and more about Winona and her writing after her thoughts on the matter. Now, without further ado… Introducing Winona Hulsey:

Author Wenona Hulsey spends her time scaling roof tops, kicking bad guy tail, and rescuing small kittens from tree tops. But during the time when she isn’t asleep, she’s a mother of two beautiful children and works a full time day job. She lives vicariously through great books and creates magical worlds in her spare time. She is also an avid social networker, who loves to meet new people.

Dec 072012
 

There are three really tough parts to any writing project.

– The beginning

– The middle

– The end

As we have seen, there are land mines in every step of the writing process. Monday and Wednesday we covered the beginning and the middle. Today we will go over the end, but let me caution you. I’ve only covered the parts of the process where the initial writing takes place. Once the story is written, there is the editing process to contend with. But that’s a topic for another week. First we have to contend with the end.

Dec 032012
 

There are three really tough parts to any writing project.

– The beginning

– The middle

– The end.

Yea, yea, I know that’s pretty much the whole of it. Each part is difficult in their own way, and getting over it is required if you plan to be a professional writer. Actually, you’ll have to get over all three if you want to write for anyone other than yourself. (If you are writing for yourself and you want to skip any one of these, go right ahead.)

So let’s look at these one at a time over the next few days.

Oct 052012
 

It’s October already. For those of you aware of NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) [nanowrimo.org], you know that means that it’s time to start getting ready for November. Some of the truly insane have been getting excited since August, but most of us (I’m not sure that I really can include myself, but who’s going to know?) wait until October to start getting excited.