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Jan 012016
 

It’s such a cliché to start a blog on January 1st with resolutions. Yeah, should probably resolve to use fewer clichés in my writing. I’ll get to that later. For now, I’m just happy to be back, after more than a year of no blogging. I could give you all manner of excuses about why I let the blog go, but the truth is a few bumps in my life and the habit died. I kept meaning to get back to it (insert cliché about good intentions and Hell). Ultimately it came down to “It was too much like work and I didn’t have the time.”

Jun 242013
 

The Fourth Street Fantasy Convention is a bit different from other conventions that I go to. For one, there is a single programming track which means that everyone (mostly) goes to every panel. Most conventions that I attend are multi track which generally means that everything that I want to see is at the same time and the rest is just a matter of boredom control (OK, not quite that bad, but somehow programming managers always manage to pit the really good stuff against each other). Other than not having to decide which panel to go to, this allows for a certain amount of blending of the panels. That is, later panels can reference things that were discussed from earlier panels with a high level of confidence that most of the audience would know what they were talking about. This is both wonderful and a bit disconcerting at the same time.

Feb 042013
 

Among the writing rules is one that I actually agree with most of the time: torture your characters. That sounds a little extreme, but for the most part it is good advice. Why? Because good story rise out of conflict, conflict comes from adversity, and adversity means that things are going wrong.

Jan 162013
 

Back in high school, I remember arguing with my teachers about how to take notes and outline papers. I get it now that they were just trying to teach me a method of organizing my thoughts and I really shouldn’t blame them for not realizing that my brain doesn’t work in the standard outline form. I made it through high school and on into college where the professors no longer cared how I took notes just so long as my papers were organized and I could answer all my test questions. That is when I learned how to take notes in the way that my mind actually processed things, and suddenly school became a lot easier.

Jan 142013
 

In my role as and Educational ASL Interpreter, my students have learned that I make a darned good tutor when it comes to their English papers. And a frustrating one as well. What causes this particular set of feelings is the way that I tutor them. Word by word, without ever telling them what to say, I pick apart their sentences until each one is grammatically correct. Once one sentence is correct, I send them off to fix the rest of the paragraph on their own. I can totally understand their frustration. It was the same method that my favorite (and most hated) interpreting teacher used. I know that frustration well, and I know the results.

Jan 022013
 

If you are looking for the New Years Blog Hop from Carrie Ann’s Blog Hops, please click here.

 

The Next Big Thing is a rolling blog hop that’s been going around for a while. I was tagged by the lovely and talented Devin Harnois.

 

What is your working title of your book?

Hero’s Call

 

Where did the idea come from for the book?

When I was working on what will now be book 2 – The Queen’s Own – I realized that much of the back story really needed to be told. So I started digging into it and noticed that a story I thought would be a stand alone novel is really a trilogy.

Dec 052012
 

There are three really tough parts to any writing project.

– The beginning

– The middle

– The end

Monday we covered the beginning. So here we are today, Wednesday, the middle of the week, so let’s get on with “The Middle”. The middle is where you find all the juicy bits, the fun parts that get you from “Oh no, I just lost my job” to “Why yes, I am Lord of all I see”. Or something like that.

The Middle

Dec 032012
 

There are three really tough parts to any writing project.

– The beginning

– The middle

– The end.

Yea, yea, I know that’s pretty much the whole of it. Each part is difficult in their own way, and getting over it is required if you plan to be a professional writer. Actually, you’ll have to get over all three if you want to write for anyone other than yourself. (If you are writing for yourself and you want to skip any one of these, go right ahead.)

So let’s look at these one at a time over the next few days.

Nov 022012
 

This weekend, as part of my personal noveling marathon, I will be joining 9 other WriMos (writers who participate in NaNoWriMo) in a writing retreat we like to call the Jump Start Weekend. It will be a weekend full of just writing, writing madly, and getting a tremendous word count right away at the beginning of the month while will are all still totally hyped about our novels. We are leaving our non-writing friends and families behind – because they are distractions from putting words on the page.